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la déesse de babylone

partyinthenunnery:

Greek Gods 

(thanks to chelidon for Greek help)

(via fyeahgreekmythology)

— 1 week ago with 8246 notes
i-have-never-been-wise:

I Was Fond of You, a playlist for Achilles and Patroclus
Listen Here [x]

1. King of Carrot Flowers - Neutral Milk Hotel: When you were young you were the king of carrot flowers
2. Turn On Me - The Shins: You had to know that I was fond of you
3. Poison Oak - Bright Eyes: I was young enough, I still believed in war
4. Thoughts of Flight - Edmund: Close my eyes, and I’m still there
5. For the Windows in Paradise - Sufjan Stevens: I’ll do anything for you
6. If I had a Boat - James Vincent McMorrow: The Sea is not my friend, and everyone conspires
7. No One Would Riot for Less - Bright Eyes: Little soldier, little insect, you know war, it has no heart
8. To Build a Home - Cinematic Orchestra: I built a home for you, for me, until it disappeared
9. Love you More than Life - Neutral Milk Hotel: Let the world collapse and die, it’s sinking deeper in your eyes
10. Our Window - Noah and the Whale: I don’t think that it’s the end, but I know we can’t keep going
11. Love, Love, Love - The Mountain Goats: Now we see things, as in a mirror dimly
12. No Rest - Dry the River: Did you see the fear in my heart, did you see me bleeding out?
13. If I had a Heart - Fever Ray: After the night when I wake up, I’ll see what tomorrow brings
14. Black - Okkervil River: Wreck his life, the way that he wrecked yours
15. Woke Up New - The Mountain Goats: What do I do, without you?

i-have-never-been-wise:

I Was Fond of You, a playlist for Achilles and Patroclus

Listen Here [x]

1. King of Carrot Flowers - Neutral Milk Hotel: When you were young you were the king of carrot flowers

2. Turn On Me - The Shins: You had to know that I was fond of you

3. Poison Oak - Bright Eyes: I was young enough, I still believed in war

4. Thoughts of Flight - Edmund: Close my eyes, and I’m still there

5. For the Windows in Paradise - Sufjan Stevens: I’ll do anything for you

6. If I had a Boat - James Vincent McMorrow: The Sea is not my friend, and everyone conspires

7. No One Would Riot for Less - Bright Eyes: Little soldier, little insect, you know war, it has no heart

8. To Build a Home - Cinematic Orchestra: I built a home for you, for me, until it disappeared

9. Love you More than Life - Neutral Milk Hotel: Let the world collapse and die, it’s sinking deeper in your eyes

10. Our Window - Noah and the Whale: I don’t think that it’s the end, but I know we can’t keep going

11. Love, Love, Love - The Mountain Goats: Now we see things, as in a mirror dimly

12. No Rest - Dry the River: Did you see the fear in my heart, did you see me bleeding out?

13. If I had a Heart - Fever Ray: After the night when I wake up, I’ll see what tomorrow brings

14. Black - Okkervil River: Wreck his life, the way that he wrecked yours

15. Woke Up New - The Mountain Goats: What do I do, without you?

(Source: zonerunners, via fyeahgreekmythology)

— 1 week ago with 290 notes
dragonfiretwisted:

Greek Mythology Dreamcast - Daniel Sharman as Phobos & Ben Barnes as Deimos
Deimos was the god (daimon) of fear, dread and terror, and his twin-brother Phobos of panic fear, flight and battlefield rout. They were sons of the god Ares, who accompanied their father into battle, driving his chariot and spreading fear in their wake. As sons of Aphrodite, goddess of love, the twins also represented the fear of loss.
In classical art the two were usually represented as youths. Phobos was sometimes depicted with a lion or lion-like head…(x)

dragonfiretwisted:

Greek Mythology Dreamcast - Daniel Sharman as Phobos & Ben Barnes as Deimos

Deimos was the god (daimon) of fear, dread and terror, and his twin-brother Phobos of panic fear, flight and battlefield rout. They were sons of the god Ares, who accompanied their father into battle, driving his chariot and spreading fear in their wake. As sons of Aphrodite, goddess of love, the twins also represented the fear of loss.

In classical art the two were usually represented as youths. Phobos was sometimes depicted with a lion or lion-like head…(x)

(via fyeahgreekmythology)

— 1 week ago with 531 notes
fleurdulys:

Eros and the Goddesses of Destiny - Julius Kronberg
1908

fleurdulys:

Eros and the Goddesses of Destiny - Julius Kronberg

1908

(via fyeahgreekmythology)

— 1 week ago with 4098 notes

mythology meme:  [6/8] myths, legends, and stories
↳ izanagi no mikoto and izanami no mikoto

Part of the Japanese creation myth, the story of Izanagi and Izanami tells of the birth of the eight great Japanese islands (at least the ones that were part of ancient Japan). Izanagi and Izanami played a part in both Kamiumi and Kuniumi, the birth of the gods and the birth of the lands.
Of the seventh and last generation of the great Kamiyonayo, Izanami and Izanagi would be responsible for both the birth of the Japanese islands as well as the birth of other gods, who’d later become deities. Although the beginning of their union was rocky, they succeeded. They had a great many children, but during the birth of Kagutsuchi, the god of fire, Izanami died from the severe burns. Izanagi killed Kagutsuchi and descended into Yomi, the underworld, to plead for his wife’s return. 
He found Izanami, but she stayed in the shadows of Yomi and told him she’d already eaten the food of the underworld and therefore belonged with the dead. However, Izanagi refused to take ‘no’ for an answer and after long negotiations, Izanami asked for a night’s rest before she returned to the world of the living with her husband, and warned him not to come to her bedroom. After waiting a long time, Izanagi got curious and entered the room. Using a comb from his hair, he made it into a torch, and in the beam of light he saw his once beautiful wife’s rotting and horrid form. Terrified, Izanagi fled while Izanami sent shikome after him. Eventually, Izanagi managed to exit Yomi, and rolled a large stone in front of its entrance. Izanami yelled from behind the stone that she’d kill a thousand people every day since he’d abandoned her. Izanagi answered that he’d give life to a thousand and five hundred. 

mythology meme:  [6/8] myths, legends, and stories

↳ izanagi no mikoto and izanami no mikoto

Part of the Japanese creation myth, the story of Izanagi and Izanami tells of the birth of the eight great Japanese islands (at least the ones that were part of ancient Japan). Izanagi and Izanami played a part in both Kamiumi and Kuniumi, the birth of the gods and the birth of the lands.

Of the seventh and last generation of the great Kamiyonayo, Izanami and Izanagi would be responsible for both the birth of the Japanese islands as well as the birth of other gods, who’d later become deities. Although the beginning of their union was rocky, they succeeded. They had a great many children, but during the birth of Kagutsuchi, the god of fire, Izanami died from the severe burns. Izanagi killed Kagutsuchi and descended into Yomi, the underworld, to plead for his wife’s return.

He found Izanami, but she stayed in the shadows of Yomi and told him she’d already eaten the food of the underworld and therefore belonged with the dead. However, Izanagi refused to take ‘no’ for an answer and after long negotiations, Izanami asked for a night’s rest before she returned to the world of the living with her husband, and warned him not to come to her bedroom. After waiting a long time, Izanagi got curious and entered the room. Using a comb from his hair, he made it into a torch, and in the beam of light he saw his once beautiful wife’s rotting and horrid form. Terrified, Izanagi fled while Izanami sent shikome after him. Eventually, Izanagi managed to exit Yomi, and rolled a large stone in front of its entrance. Izanami yelled from behind the stone that she’d kill a thousand people every day since he’d abandoned her. Izanagi answered that he’d give life to a thousand and five hundred. 

— 1 week ago with 318 notes
angesnus:

Editorial Fashion on Medusa

angesnus:

Editorial Fashion on Medusa

— 1 week ago with 466 notes
ducleto:

Bacchanale des Andriens, Le Titien (1518-1519).

ducleto:

Bacchanale des Andriens, Le Titien (1518-1519).

— 1 week ago with 4 notes